Future Marine Biologist

the-shark-blog:

TOP SHARKS List # 1

Most Extreme Mouth: Basking shark

  • The Megamouth shark was a very close runner up, but the Basking shark receives the title this time. But don’t be frightened. Their mouth may be extreme, but it’s designed so it can filter tiny plankton out of the water. Even though it may not look like it, they do have teeth. Many of them actually, but they are extremely small. 

Most Badass Babies: Sand Tiger shark

  • Sand Tiger sharks exhibit intrauterine cannibalism. This means while in the womb the embryo that reaches about 10cm first will feed off of the smaller embryos. After about 8-12 months the mother sand tiger shark will give birth to a single young, a young who just spent it’s time in the womb consuming its could’ve-been siblings. Pretty badass~

Most Extreme Tail: Thresher shark

  • Thresher sharks are immediately identifiable by their long, whip-like caudal fin that they use as a weapon to stun their prey. Because just using fins for stabilization and swimming was just too boring for them.

Most Toxic: Greenland shark

  • Eating a shark is never good, but eating a Greenland shark is much worse. Their meat is actually quite toxic due to the toxintrimethylamine oxide. Unfortunately people have found methods of preparing the meat to avoid getting sick. (Boooooo..)

Most Metal: Tiger shark

  • Unfortunately, Tiger sharks don’t get this title because they’re cruising around listening to various heavy metal bands on their MP3 players. This title is given to them because they’ve been found with actual metal objects in their stomachs. And we’re not talking about some unlucky paparazzi diver who got his camera eaten, we’re talking license plates and other metal objects that shouldn’t be in the sea. Although it’s not surprising for them, they’ll even eat other sharks species. People probably wished you were more like them when you were growing up and having your ~super picky about food~ phase.

Credits: [Basking][Sand Tiger][Thresher][Greenland][Tiger]

Q&A: Why your help is needed when sea turtles wash ashore on Pacific NW beaches

usfwspacific:

By Laura Todd
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Field Supervisor in Newport, Oregon, endangered species biologist; lover of turtles, snakes, frogs and all things slithery; and weekend shepherdess to a small flock of friendly Shetland sheep.

A sea turtle washed up on an Oregon beach late last month and many of you responded to our Facebook plea for help to find the turtle. Almost 10,000 of you shared our post and asked others to help find the hypothermic turtle that was returned to the ocean by good-intentioned passers-by. Thank you for helping search for this turtle.

The turtle has not been found, and we can only hope for the best.

image

This sea turtle, which washed ashore on an Oregon beach, was likely suffering from hypothermia. Photo provided by USFWS.

However, many excellent questions came up through our social media posts. Here are some of the questions and answers.

Question: Why did this happen if the turtle is a warm-water turtle? Did it take a wrong turn?

Answer: Many species of sea turtles occur throughout the Pacific Ocean, including the relatively cold waters of Oregon and Washington coasts. Some sea turtles even occur in Alaska!  Our coastal waters are highly productive and provide excellent food resources.  However, sea

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fruitgod:

Glow x

gay-of-demonic-charm:

flyinginafriendshipship:

what if church was called jesuscon

if you pray hard enough you get an extra hour in the biblepit

Check out this much anticipated video of the “sea pig,” a pelagic holothurian (Sea Cucumber) - make sure you stick around until the end of clip when he gets up close…

funkysafari:

Whale Shark, Maldives by Andrey Narchuk

funkysafari:

Whale Shark, Maldives by Andrey Narchuk

malformalady:

This two-tusked Narwhal skull is a rare example, as males usually only have one. Narwhals are toothed-whales and in males, one tooth erupts as a long tusk. In rare case, both front teeth erupt, giving two tusks. Each tooth/tusk was a little under 2m long. Hunde Island, Greenland
Photo credit: Tim Melling

malformalady:

This two-tusked Narwhal skull is a rare example, as males usually only have one. Narwhals are toothed-whales and in males, one tooth erupts as a long tusk. In rare case, both front teeth erupt, giving two tusks. Each tooth/tusk was a little under 2m long. Hunde Island, Greenland

Photo credit: Tim Melling

montereybayaquarium:

Plankton of the world, beware!

While most nudibranchs, or sea slugs, crawl and graze, the melibe sweeps its hood through the water like a net, capturing unsuspecting tiny drifters. A fringe of tentacles interlock and trap prey as the hood collapses to help the slug digest its meal.

Melibes may be expert plankton snatchers, but how do these soft-bodied invertebrates escape being a meal? Researchers have followed their noses to the melibe’s uniquely fruity smell—noxious secretions which may ward off nibbling fish. They can also “swim” away from predators by wiggling from side to side. 

Living on giant kelp fronds or sea grass, melibes live higher up in the water column than most seafloor-bound nudibranchs. They’ve adapted well to the vertical life—as you can see in the background, their white ribbon eggs hang and sway with currents.

Learn more

It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.

Hunter S. Thompson

"While he was talking about piracy and salvage in the Florida Keys, there is an ecological attractiveness in this statement that cuts to the core of our relationship with the ocean and sharks in particular." - IUCN

(via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)