Future Marine Biologist
fruitgod:

Glow x

gay-of-demonic-charm:

flyinginafriendshipship:

what if church was called jesuscon

if you pray hard enough you get an extra hour in the biblepit

Check out this much anticipated video of the “sea pig,” a pelagic holothurian (Sea Cucumber) - make sure you stick around until the end of clip when he gets up close…

funkysafari:

Whale Shark, Maldives by Andrey Narchuk

funkysafari:

Whale Shark, Maldives by Andrey Narchuk

malformalady:

This two-tusked Narwhal skull is a rare example, as males usually only have one. Narwhals are toothed-whales and in males, one tooth erupts as a long tusk. In rare case, both front teeth erupt, giving two tusks. Each tooth/tusk was a little under 2m long. Hunde Island, Greenland
Photo credit: Tim Melling

malformalady:

This two-tusked Narwhal skull is a rare example, as males usually only have one. Narwhals are toothed-whales and in males, one tooth erupts as a long tusk. In rare case, both front teeth erupt, giving two tusks. Each tooth/tusk was a little under 2m long. Hunde Island, Greenland

Photo credit: Tim Melling

montereybayaquarium:

Plankton of the world, beware!

While most nudibranchs, or sea slugs, crawl and graze, the melibe sweeps its hood through the water like a net, capturing unsuspecting tiny drifters. A fringe of tentacles interlock and trap prey as the hood collapses to help the slug digest its meal.

Melibes may be expert plankton snatchers, but how do these soft-bodied invertebrates escape being a meal? Researchers have followed their noses to the melibe’s uniquely fruity smell—noxious secretions which may ward off nibbling fish. They can also “swim” away from predators by wiggling from side to side. 

Living on giant kelp fronds or sea grass, melibes live higher up in the water column than most seafloor-bound nudibranchs. They’ve adapted well to the vertical life—as you can see in the background, their white ribbon eggs hang and sway with currents.

Learn more

It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.

Hunter S. Thompson

"While he was talking about piracy and salvage in the Florida Keys, there is an ecological attractiveness in this statement that cuts to the core of our relationship with the ocean and sharks in particular." - IUCN

(via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)

cosima-niehaus:

fulloffeels:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

sixpenceee:

Before I get into it, just know the pictures just serve as visual representations, not actual pictures

Okay so anyway, evidence for this theory is the following:

THE FACT THAT HUMANS ARE SO HAIRLESS: 

Only two kind of habitats give rise to hairless animals, an aquatic one and a one below the ground (a naked mole rat for example)

.The suggestion that humans have become hairless to prevent overheating has been rendered false because hair can act like a defense against the sun.

This is why camels retain their fur even in the hot dessert environment. 

OUR FAT CELLS

We have ten times the number of fat cells as expected in an animal our size. Only two types of animals have large fat cells: hibernating and aquatic ones. 

In hibernating it’s seasonal fat, but in aquatic it’s all year round. It’s unreasonable to think that we evolved this feature in land because large fat pockets would have just slowed us down. 

Primate babies are always born slender, but human babies start to develop fat even before birth. 

WALKING ON TWO LEGS

So we’re the only mammals that have developed bipedalism. This is a surprise, because walking on 2 legs vs. walking on 4 legs is very disadvantageous. It’s slower, unstable, our organs are vulnerable to damage.

One theory is that if our habitat was flooded, we’d have to walk on two legs to keep our heads above the water.

The only animal who has ever evolved a pelvis like ours, the swamp ape, used this method. 

BREATHING

We have conscious control over our breathing. Ever other land animal doesn’t. Mammals like dolphins and seals also conscious control because it tells them how deep they are going to dive and they can estimate how much air they need to inhale.

OTHER DIFFERENCES

Our body is so wasteful of salt and water. Think of tears and our way of sweating. Other land mammals don’t have this. Water mammals do however. 

Okay anyway I hope you learned something. 

Here’s a source and where you can find more information: X

For more interesting posts like this, go here: X

So. Basically. We were FUCKING MERMAIDS. Damn.

I mainly want to believe this is correct so I can be descended from mermaids

Also! we’re pruny. we have a better grip on submerged objects when our fingertips are pruny. ah wow theories,

trynottodrown:

Porbeagle Shark
GENERAL DESCRIPTION The porbeagle (Lamna nasus) is a common, fast-swimming, potentially dangerous shark. They are dark gray on top and white underneath; there is also a small patch of white on the rear edge of the dorsal fin. Porbeagles have a torpedo-shaped body and two keels on the tail, making it an efficient swimmer.  Porbeagles are functionally warm-blooded; they retain the heat generated by their muscles and recycle it to heat their body, keeping their body temperature up to 20°F (11°C) warmer than the cold waters they live in. SIZE This mackerel shark can grow to be up to 12 feet (3.7 m), weighing about 350-550 pounds (160-250 kg). HABITAT AND DISTRIBUTION Porbeagles live in cold waters down to about 1,200 feet (370 m). These common sharks live in the North and South Atlantic and the South Pacific Oceans. TEETH AND DIET The porbeagle feed on fish (mostly mackerel, squid, cod, hake, flounder and other bottom-dwelling fish) with its long, sharp teeth. SPEED AND SWIMMING The porbeagle is a very fast, powerful swimmer. Porbeagles have a torpedo-shaped body and two keels on the tail, making it an efficient swimmer. Porbeagles must swim continuously to get oxygen. REPRODUCTION Porbeagles are viviparous (they give birth to live young). Embryos are cannibalistic in the womb; only 2-4 pups survive pregnancy. PORBEAGLE SHARK CLASSIFICATION Kingdom Animalia (animals) Phylum Chordata SubPhylum Vertebrata (vertebrates) Class Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fish) Subclass Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays) Order Lamniformes Family Lamnidae Genus Lamna Species nasus
Photo Source

trynottodrown:

Porbeagle Shark

GENERAL DESCRIPTION
The porbeagle (Lamna nasus) is a common, fast-swimming, potentially dangerous shark. They are dark gray on top and white underneath; there is also a small patch of white on the rear edge of the dorsal fin. Porbeagles have a torpedo-shaped body and two keels on the tail, making it an efficient swimmer.

Porbeagles are functionally warm-blooded; they retain the heat generated by their muscles and recycle it to heat their body, keeping their body temperature up to 20°F (11°C) warmer than the cold waters they live in.

SIZE
This mackerel shark can grow to be up to 12 feet (3.7 m), weighing about 350-550 pounds (160-250 kg).

HABITAT AND DISTRIBUTION
Porbeagles live in cold waters down to about 1,200 feet (370 m). These common sharks live in the North and South Atlantic and the South Pacific Oceans.

TEETH AND DIET
The porbeagle feed on fish (mostly mackerel, squid, cod, hake, flounder and other bottom-dwelling fish) with its long, sharp teeth.


SPEED AND SWIMMING
The porbeagle is a very fast, powerful swimmer. Porbeagles have a torpedo-shaped body and two keels on the tail, making it an efficient swimmer. Porbeagles must swim continuously to get oxygen.

REPRODUCTION
Porbeagles are viviparous (they give birth to live young). Embryos are cannibalistic in the womb; only 2-4 pups survive pregnancy.

PORBEAGLE SHARK CLASSIFICATION
Kingdom Animalia (animals)
Phylum Chordata
SubPhylum Vertebrata (vertebrates)
Class Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fish)
Subclass Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays)
Order Lamniformes
Family Lamnidae
Genus Lamna
Species nasus

Photo Source

jtotheizzoe:

Beautiful, huh?
Chances are better than slim that this picture has popped up on your Tumblr dashboard (or elsewhere) during your recent internet wanderings. All that strange and beautiful life, present in just a single drop of seawater! A microscopic bestiary overflowing with life’s smallest oddities! Isn’t it amazing?
Just one problem: It’s not true. 
This is certainly a collection of zooplankton (what we call non-photosynthetic plankton species), but it’s absolutely not from a single drop of ocean. As Miriam Goldstein explains at Deep Sea News, it’s from a volume more like that of a swimming pool, captured and concentrated in a special net that scientists use to survey these microscopic species. Check the link to find out more about why and how scientists collect these beautiful samples!
So who cares? What’s the difference if it’s a drop or if it’s a swimming pool? The problem is that we’re missing out on some very cool truth by lazily inserting some very cool lies. We don’t need to lie about how amazing nature is. The ocean is (quite literally) full of amazing life. We can celebrate that without inventing a story, right? Because the real story, the one that uses a beautiful image to connect us to actual scientific research, is awesome in its own right.
Although this image has gone viral recently, I posted it five months ago, wrong information and all. I didn’t check to make sure that what I posted was true, and that was my bad. I should do better. We all should. 

jtotheizzoe:

Beautiful, huh?

Chances are better than slim that this picture has popped up on your Tumblr dashboard (or elsewhere) during your recent internet wanderings. All that strange and beautiful life, present in just a single drop of seawater! A microscopic bestiary overflowing with life’s smallest oddities! Isn’t it amazing?

Just one problem: It’s not true. 

This is certainly a collection of zooplankton (what we call non-photosynthetic plankton species), but it’s absolutely not from a single drop of ocean. As Miriam Goldstein explains at Deep Sea News, it’s from a volume more like that of a swimming pool, captured and concentrated in a special net that scientists use to survey these microscopic species. Check the link to find out more about why and how scientists collect these beautiful samples!

So who cares? What’s the difference if it’s a drop or if it’s a swimming pool? The problem is that we’re missing out on some very cool truth by lazily inserting some very cool lies. We don’t need to lie about how amazing nature is. The ocean is (quite literally) full of amazing life. We can celebrate that without inventing a story, right? Because the real story, the one that uses a beautiful image to connect us to actual scientific research, is awesome in its own right.

Although this image has gone viral recently, I posted it five months ago, wrong information and all. I didn’t check to make sure that what I posted was true, and that was my bad. I should do better. We all should.